Tweed Valley Neighbourhood Watch

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Neighbourhood Watch Australasia’s Remote and Vulnerable Communities Project (RAVC) received a bronze award in the community-led category of the 2017 Australian Crime and Violence Prevention Awards (ACVPA). 

The ACVPAs recognise best practice in the prevention or reduction of violence and other types of crime in Australia.

“Neighbourhood Watch Australasia has produced a print based, highly visual, culturally relevant, large stand alone, flip chart education resource called Speak Up,  designed to educate people who don’t hold English as a first language, on how to seek help,” said Neighbourhood Watch Australasia’s inaugural Chief Executive Officer Ingrid Stonhill, who developed the program.

“The educational resource gives examples of what situations match which emergency service and how the call needs to be made.

“Speak Up, which has been implemented following broad community consultation, addresses the lack of understanding and confidence in reporting crime.  All too often we assume people know how to seek help.

“Educating people on how to ask for help also encourages reporting and ensures police are being made aware of community safety issues they might not otherwise have been alerted to,” said Mrs Stonhill.

Neighbourhood Watch Australasia (NHWA) is the overarching organisation of all member Neighbourhood Watch programs, working collaboratively to offer higher calibre resources.

“To now have an Award Winning resource is a wonderful testament to the significant contribution we make to creating safe, connected and inclusive communities,” said NHWA President, Bernie Durkin.

These annual awards recognise the outstanding contributions being made across Australia for crime prevention, including the development and implementation of practical projects to reduce violence and other types of crime in the community.

“The Neighbourhood Watch Australasia RAVC Project provides education and awareness resources to remote Indigenous communities in Western Australia and the Northern Territory, encouraging local residents to report crime and seek assistance through emergency services,” said acting Australian Institute of Criminology (AIC) Director, Nicole Rose PSM.

“By addressing the communication break down between local police, emergency services and community members, the visual Speak Up resource produced in simple English is working towards reducing both violent and property crime in these remote communities.”

All projects are assessed each year by the ACVPA Board, which consists of senior law enforcement representatives from each state and territory police service, and chaired by the acting AIC Director.

Northern Territory ACVPA Board representative, Superintendent Virginia Read said the Speak Up resources are an excellent tool to assist those needing emergency services to provide accurate information and improve response times.

“Northern Territory Police recognise the efforts of Neighbourhood Watch Australasia to improve personal safety of those who live in remote areas. The services we have in urban areas are often restricted and what we take for granted is not always the case when you live somewhere like Maningrida for example,” said Superintendent Read.
The awards are a joint initiative of the Australian, state and territory governments, coordinated by the AIC and co-sponsored by the Law, Crime and Community Safety Council.

For information about the Australian Crime and Violence Prevention Awards visit www.aic.gov.au/acvpa

Bernie Durkin, NHWA President is cycling solo across Australia, to promote the importance of keeping Australia Safe. Connecting neighbours to neighbours along the way through Neighbourhood Watch.

Combining a passion for cycling and a passion for community safety is what has driven Bernie Durkin to undertake the biggest personal challenge of his life. Cycling solo across Australia to promote the importance of keeping Australia safe. 

Bernie, 55, married, a father of two, is the Executive Manager of Community Engagement for Western Australia Police and Director of the state-wide Neighbourhood Watch program. Bernie is the President of Neighbourhood Watch Australasia, a collaboration of all member Neighbourhood Watch programs across Australia and New Zealand.

NHWA believes that getting to know your neighbours, those who live around you is one of the simplest and easiest ways to keep yourself and your community safe. Being aware of who lives in your apartment block, house next door or in your street, can enable the identification of unusual activities or traffic movements that may seem suspicious. Joining a NHW Group and working with policing agencies, is an easy way to contribute to ensuring everyone is safe.

Bernie plans to connect as many people as possible through the NHWConnect App (on line NHW group) on his 4,000 km ride from the west to east coasts of Australia. Leaving from Scarborough Beach, WA, on Saturday 25th February, Bernie plans to arrive at Bondi Beach, NSW by Saturday 8th April 2017. Bernie believes by promoting the simple actions of one individual connecting to another he can raise awareness that community safety is everyone’s responsibility.

Bernie is riding solo, with no support vehicle and only a small bike trailer of supplies. He is hoping that friendly road users will assist him by providing him with some water or supplies if he finds himself short of either. Sleeping in a tent, Bernie plans to be as self-sufficient as possible, but hopes the goodwill and community spirit of fellow Aussie’s will help him across the country.

Bernie will be tracked and have his daily safety monitored by NHWA. A blog will be updated three times a week and regular updates will be posted on NHWA Facebook, so that his progress and adventures can be tracked and viewed by you.

Source: Neighbourhood Watch Australasia

How to spot a fake email

How to spot a fake email

Watch out for fake parcel delivery scams this Christmas

Scammers are sending emails pretending to be from Australia Post or FedEx, to try and trick you into believing you have an ‘undeliverable package’. In some cases, these emails may include your name and address and include legitimate-looking company information, complete with fake logos.

The email may threaten to charge you a fee for holding your ‘undelivered item’, and will ask you to open an attachment, click a link or download a file to retrieve your parcel. If you follow these instructions, you will likely download a ransomware virus that locks your computer.

To unlock your computer, scammers demand payment in the form of bitcoins (a form of online currency) or wire transfer. Even if you pay the fee, there is no guarantee that you will be able to access your computer again.

Australia Post will never call you out of the blue to request payment or send you an email asking you to click on an attachment.

If you receive an email about an un-deliverable package, don’t open any attachments or download files – delete it straight away!

Find out more at Scamwatch.gov.au

National Missing Persons Week

National Missing Persons Week – first week in August

One person goes missing every 15 minutes in Australia, more than 35,000 people are reported missing each year, and more than 2,000 people are currently listed as a long-term missing person.

It is a common myth in the community that people have to wait 24 hours to report a person as missing—this is not the case. Report your concerns to police immediately.

Most people reported missing to police are located within a short period of time. Of those reported, more than 95 per cent are located within one week and 99.5 per cent of all missing persons are eventually located. While the majority of those reported are located, a significant number of people, approximately 1600, remain missing long-term (for more than three months).

Anyone, regardless of gender, age, ethnicity or educational background, may become a missing person; however, adults are more likely to be listed as long-term missing persons.

For more information, and to view profiles of missing persons in Australia, visit www.missingpersons.gov.au.

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Important Contacts

Tweed Heads Police Station

07 5506 9499


Kingscliff Police Station

02 6674 9399


Brunswick Heads Police Station

02 6685 1277


Murwillumbah Police Station

02 6672 9499


Crime Stoppers 

1800 333 000


Police Assistance Line
Non Emergency
131 444

Emergency

000


State Emergency Service (SES)

132 500