Tweed Valley Neighbourhood Watch

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Member for Tweed, Geoff Provest, has welcomed the announcement that new Plain English Apprehended Domestic Violence Orders (ADVO) will roll out statewide on 3 December so perpetrators have no excuses for not understanding the orders.

“These new ADVOs use clear and simple language so there is no excuse for a domestic violence perpetrator to breach an order.”, Mr Provest said.

“We have removed all the complex legal jargon and spelled out a defendant’s obligations in Plain English, so they can no longer claim they didn’t understand the meaning or consequences of the ADVO.”

“The Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research found that one in five ADVOs are breached, and the NSW Government is making it clear – any breach is an unacceptable risk.”

“The new ADVOs are designed to put a stop to violence, intimidation and harassment through a clear explanation of what a perpetrator can and cannot do under the order.”

The new ADVO is also being translated into 29 different languages to assist people whose first language is not English.

In addition, the penalties for breaching an order, including up to two years in prison, have been moved to the top of the document so it’s now the first thing perpetrators see.

Chief Executive Officer of White Ribbon Australia, Libby Davies, welcomed the introduction of Plain English ADVOs as a critical step to strengthen the safety of women.

“ADVOs are powerful tools but must be easily accessible and understood to ensure they are effective. We commend the NSW Government on this initiative,” Ms Davies said.

In addition, the NSW Government’s recent changes to ADVOs means final ADVO applications can be determined even if the victim doesn’t come to court, they will protect a victim’s current partner if they are being harassed by the victim’s ex-partner, and will stop self-represented defendants from personally cross-examining child witnesses during ADVO applications.

New traffic crash reporting requirements in NSW

New traffic crash reporting requirements in NSW

From Wednesday 15 October 2014 police will only be required to attend and investigate crashes if they meet one or more of three criteria:

  1. Where a person is killed or injured;
  2. Parties fail to exchange particulars;
  3. A driver appears to be under the influence of alcohol or drugs.

Drivers involved in traffic crashes where their vehicle needs to be towed (when none of the above criteria apply) can now organise their own tow, leave the area and later report the crash to the Police Assistance Line on 131 444.

In addition drivers will no longer need to report minor collisions to police even for insurance purposes.

The new streamlined process is part of a red-tape reduction initiative to better manage crashes on NSW roads.

More information can be found in the NSW Police media release.

NSW Police are urging motorists to familiarise themselves with changes to the way traffic crashes are reported in NSW as they come into effect next week on Wednesday 15 October 2014.

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Radio advertisements notifying the changes have started on both Sydney and Regional AM and FM stations, which aim to reach drivers on their daily commute to and from work and home.

The new streamlined process – which starts next Wednesday (15 October 2014) – is part of a red-tape reduction initiative to better manage crashes on NSW roads.

From Wednesday 15 October 2014, police will only be required to attend and investigate crashes if they meet one or more of three criteria:

  1. Where a person is killed or injured;
  2. Parties fail to exchange particulars;
  3. A driver appears to be under the influence of alcohol or drugs.

Drivers involved in traffic crashes where their vehicle needs to be towed – and none of the above criteria apply – can now organise their own tow and leave the area, and later report the crash to the Police Assistance Line on 131 444.

In addition, drivers will no longer need to report minor collisions to police, even for insurance purposes.

Traffic and Highway Patrol Commander, Assistant Commissioner John Hartley, urged motorists to become familiar with the changes.

“With only one week to go until the changes come into effect, we are strongly urging all motorists to go online to our website and learn what to do in a crash situation – and download an informative ‘flow-chart’ flyer.

“Drivers may no longer need to wait for police in a tow-away only crash and will not need to report minor collisions for insurance purposes where no vehicles are towed.

“We are also reaching out to drivers in their vehicles through radio advertisements, as they travel to and from work and home, ensuring the message is getting out there to all motorists.

“The new streamlined process is about cutting back red tape and diverting police resources into broader road safety initiatives and other investigations,” Assistant Commissioner Hartley said.

Police will also attend to direct traffic and deal with hazards or debris on the road, as well as assist with the tow of heavy vehicles.

Currently they attend and investigate where a person is killed or injured; parties fail to exchange particulars; a driver is under the influence; or, a vehicle involved requires towing from the scene.

In such instances if a vehicle requires towing from the scene and no one is injured or under the influence, and all parties exchange details:

  • Motorists should organise their own tow and have their vehicle removed from the scene as quickly and safely as possible.
  • Once this has occurred they should report the crash to the Police Assistance Line on 131 444.

NB. If motorists exhaust all other options to have their vehicles towed, the Police Assistance Line will be able to provide further guidance and assistance.
* Also, from Wednesday 15 October 2014, reports of ‘minor’ traffic crashes – where vehicles do not require towing – will no longer be recorded by police. Police event numbers will not be issued for these incidents.

A ‘flowchart’ with step-by-step instructions on what to do in a crash will be sent to motorists with registration renewals, which can be kept in the glove box.

For further detailed information, please visit: www.police.nsw.gov.au/community_issues/r­oad_safety

NSW  Fair Trading Week 2013

Check your tradie.
Check your rights.

NSW Fair Trading Week is a week-long celebration to raise awareness about consumer and trader issues in the community. It will be held from 3 – 8 November 2013.

During Fair Trading Week, events all across the State will bring our message directly to the people of NSW. Our staff will be out in the community talking to consumers and visiting traders, making sure that everyone get the chance to hear about their rights and responsibilities in the marketplace.

Important Contacts

Tweed Heads Police Station

07 5506 9499


Kingscliff Police Station

02 6674 9399


Brunswick Heads Police Station

02 6685 1277


Murwillumbah Police Station

02 6672 9499


Crime Stoppers 

1800 333 000


Police Assistance Line
Non Emergency
131 444

Emergency

000


State Emergency Service (SES)

132 500